Tag Archives: italian courses in italy

When we think about Spring, we usually think about rebirth, blossoming flowers and growing plants. But during the Spring months we usually expect also a changeable and unpredictable weather. That’s why it’s advisable to wear several layers of clothing – that is to say vestirsi a cipolla (“dress like an onion”) – and to take an umbrella before going out.

We don’t have the umbrella… cavolo!
I’m warning you: if you will be caught out in a sudden downpour and will go back home with a bad cold, non piangete sul latte versato! (“don’t cry over spilled milk!”). And if also an Italian friend will be caught out in the same sudden downpour, certainly you will hear he/she screaming:

Cavolo! (literally “cabbage”, but actually it means “damn!”).Onion, milk, cabbage… Italians used to be known for having a great passion for food and that’s why Italian language is full of food-centric idioms .

Take a look at the most common food sayings:

essere buono come il pane: to be as good as bread. This is a really useful expression when you are talking about a good person but don’t have no more words to describe him/her:)

essere una pentola di fagioli: to be a grumbler. Have you ever cooked beans beans(“fagioli”)? Usually Italian grandmothers put them in a crock pot, covered with water, and cook them at low temperature for several hours. Close your eyes and listen to the continuous sound coming from the pot… it doesn’t seem like someone muttering?:)Pay attention to the sound of beans:)
essere in mezzo come il prezzemolo: to be always in the way like parsley, referring to the wide use of parsley in Italian cuisine, especially with seafood and vegetable sauces. You can use this idiom talking about someone who stick his/her nose in other people’s business. I’m sure you know someone like this:)

Book your Italian course in Rome

essere alla frutta: the party is over.
When the fruit appears on the table, all Italian people know that the meal has come to an end. Well, when you are fed up with a situation and can’t do nothing to make things better, you are at the bottom of the barrel…

essere pieno come un uovo: to be as full as en egg.full as an egg

An Italian friend has invited you to dinner and his/her mother has cooked for you. After the second course, you can’t eat anymore, but she fills your plate again and again… Dont’ you feel full just like an egg?:)

And I could go on for a long time… So, if you are planning to come to Italy, I higly recommend you to learn some of these idioms. il cacio sui maccheroniThe right expression at the right moment will be like il cacio sui maccheroni… don’t you agree?:)

by Alessia Accorrà, teacher@  Kappa Language school in Rome

Read more:

Pinocchio, a puppet’s tale

Italian courses in Italy: learn Italian in Rome

English pronunciation by Italian speakers

Any given Christmas in Italy

Croce e delizia, Rome and its public transportation

Zuppa Romana & Luca Toni

Cooking Italian, thou shalt not put pineapple on your pizza

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It so happens that the 2 oldest continuously family-owned firms in the world are Japanese – One constructing shrines and holy buildings since 578, and the other, inn-keeping since 718.

And the 3rd oldest continuously family-owned business in the world is in Molise, Italy – in the small town of Agnone where my grandfather’s cousins have been making bells since the year 1000.

liveandlearnitalian.com

liveandlearnitalian.com

La Fonderia Pontificia Marinelli is the oldest bell foundry in the world and continues today to use the original ‘lost wax’ technique of its founders. Artisans first imprint a wax form of the design onto a brick structure covered in clay, which is then overlaid with a second layer of clay to form a ‘false bell’.  When the wax inside is melted, it leaves the design imprint on the inside of the ‘false bell’. Still today, using an ancient wood-burning furnace, the molten bronze is heated to a temperature of 1200c (2200f) and poured into the space between to form the bell.

Study Italian in Italy:Agnone

liveandlearnitalian.com

liveandlearnitalian.com

Depending on the size of the bell, the process can take up to 10 months and is done entirely by hand. The work takes enormous strength, courage and concentration as any false move can ruin the process. As the pouring takes place, a local priest blesses the bronze and the workers pray. As the bell begins to cool, good wishes are exchanged.

1924     Pope Pius XI grants Papal status to the foundry – hence, its official name is       Pontificia Fonderia Marinelli

1954     Italian President honours Marinelli Family with gold medal for their prestigious     work and status as the oldest family business in Italy

Some of the famous bells created at the Marinelli Foundry:

1923     Pompeii –restoration of the Mariano Sanctuary

1950     Monte Cassino – reconstruction of the Church of San Benedetto, destroyed during the     battle of Monte Cassino in WWII

1961     Rome – commemoration of 100th anniversary of the founding of Italy

1992     Washington DC – to commemorate 500th anniversary of Christopher Columbus’s discovery of America

1995     NYC United Nations Building

2000     Rome – Jubilee Bell for St Peter’s Square, inaugurated by John Paul II

liveandlearnitalian.com

liveandlearnitalian.com

2004     Pisa – Leaning Tower, a 600k replica of the 17th century bell damaged in the bombing       of 1944

 

 

the Marinelli Bell in Pisa

 

Take a look at the foundry …

Agnone is a simple and modest place, its inhabitants are fiercely proud of their heritage and the traditions of their ancestors.

liveandlearnitalian.com

liveandlearnitalian.com

 

 

 

 

the Marinelli brothers today, Armando and Pasquale

LIVE AND LEARN ITALIAN invites you to combine study with exploring the traditions and everyday life of the region, mixing with the community and engaging in local activities. Of course, a visit to the Foundry is high on the list of special events.

Few places left for this summer! Book your Italian course in Agnone, Molise

Read more:

The last undiscovered region of Italy: Molise

Italian courses in Italy:few places left for  this summer, join Jenifer in June and July 2015, live and learn Italian,off the beaten track 

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