Tag Archives: pasta

These are the “orecchiette” (little ears) handmade pasta made by grannies in Puglia

Do you want to learn how to make them? Join our Cooking-Italian lesson!

Orecchiette alle cime di rapa is a traditional pasta from Puglia people eat with “cime di rapa” (a kind of turnip tops).

On Sunday 4th of March at 11am we will start and we will speak Italian ..

We start with a short lesson on cooking terminology given by the Italian teacher who will help with the vocabulary and assist during the preparation.

Simona, our chef, will teach you how to make pasta dough from scratch: kneading, rolling and encourage your creativity and finally closing to make the real handmade Italian pasta.

These cooking lessons are for everyone in a very pleasant atmosphere and as part of an informal, informative and fun day! Open to all levels.

So………Let’s Mani in pasta! Buon appetito con le orecchiette alle cime di rapa.

And after we will enjoy what has been prepared, eating all together our Italian pasta with !

But no worries, there will be some for you to take home too..

By taking part in this “Pasta lesson”, participants will expand and deepen their knowledge of Italian language and food culture.

A glass of Prosecco and Apulian typical finger food on arrival will welcome you
When: March 4th from 11am to 2,30

Where: Casa Tua, King’s Cross @ 106 Cromer St, Kings Cross, London WC1H 8BZ

 

Cost: £42 per head which includes all the ingredients, the use of equipment, Prosecco and Apulian typical finger food on arrival.

Few places available, booking essential

Organizers: Antonio & Giuseppe

Booking required:

gamoroso77@gmail.com

antonio.lucicesare@gmail.com

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Know your pasta: easier said than done!

Italians are so obsessed with their pasta that they actually created a chart to classify every type according to its structure, it’s lenght or its texture: it’s basically a pasta periodic table! That said, it is not surprising that many Italian language students have an hard time to recognize and name even the most common varieties of pasta, due to the fact that Italian words for pasta, although often containing open references to its appearence, usually originate from a dialect word. Moreover, some kinds of pasta have a different name for almost every region, to the point that you might be misunderstood if you ask for stortoni in Rome or maccheroni in Milan.

You might think that internet can help, but this is not always the case. Just take a look at this infographic, available in any major stock photo website.

Mistakes and misspellings in this artwork are so numerous and so hilarious that one could actually think they were made on purpose.

Let’s analyze them in details and try to learn some Italian from them:

Nidi di rondie: besides the fact that nidi di rondine are actually a particular way to cook tagliatelle, the author of this infographic just forgot an n.
Lasagnia: hey! In Italian language, the palatal sound (/ɲ/) is never followed by a diacritic . Thank you. 🙂
Funghetto:
pasta names are always plural. And that should be pretty obvious, since in every box you can find many pieces of the same variety of pasta. Just to try to search on Google “funghetto pasta” and “funghetti pasta“: can you spot the difference?
Gobetti rigatti:
the author of this image had so many problems with double consonants! Which is normal and understandable, considering that double consonants in Italian language have an importance which has no equivalent in any other European language. That said, the correct form is gobbetti (from gobba, hunchback) rigati (striped).
Konkilioni:
in the Italian orthography, the stop velar sound /k/ is represented by the letter c, possibly paired with an h when followed by a palatal vowel (e or i). Moreover, this word poses another difficulty for foreign students, since the lateral sound /ʎ/ (similar to the one you find in Spanish caballo) is very specific to Italian language and  is always written using the diacritic sequence (as in aglio, figlio, moglie, gli). Therefore, the correct form is conchiglioni.
Kanellone:
again, /k/ sound, double consonants and plural instead of singular. Correct form is cannelloni.
Cornetti rigatti: cornetti
(from corni, horns) rigati.
Elighe:
almost correct, except for the confusion between voiced and unvoiced stop velars, /k/ and /g/. In this case, the sound is unvoiced: eliche (literally fans).

Now, we really want to set the record straight. That is why we prepared a new infographic with our favourite types of pasta in the hope this will help you through the labyrinth of the pasta periodic chart!

Study Italian in Rome

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….going back to the old days when granny made pasta for the whole family

On Sunday 5th of November we will start at 11.00am and we will speak Italian ..

so also a short introduction on cooking terminology will be given by the Italian teacher who will help with the vocabulary and assist during the preparation.

These cooking lessons are for everyone in a very pleasant atmosphere and as part of an informal, informative and fun day!

So………Let’s Mani in pasta!

Simona will teach you how to make pasta dough from scratch: kneading, rolling and encourage your creativity and finally closing to make the real handmade Italian pasta con farina di castagne.
And after we will enjoy what has been prepared, eating all together our Italian  pasta with chestnut flour!

But no worries, there will be some for you to take home too..

By taking part in this “Pasta lesson”, participants will expand and deepen their knowledge of Italian language and food culture.

A glass of Prosecco and nibbles on arrival will welcome you

When:  November 5th from 11.00am to 3.00pm

Where: Casa Tua- Camden 176 Royal College St, London NW1 0SP

Cost: £39.90 per head which includes all the ingredients, the use of equipment, Prosecco and nibbles on arrival.

Search & Compare Italian Courses

Few places available, booking essential

Organizers: Antonio & Giuseppe

Booking required:gamoroso77@gmail.com    antonio.lucicesare@gmail.com

 

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